News

Adam Weber receives the Charles W. Tobias Young Investigator Award from Paul Kohl

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Adam Weber honored with the Electrochemical Society Charles W. Tobias Young Investigator Award

Congratulations to Dr. Adam Weber on being the recipient of the 2014 Electrochemical Society’s Charles W. Tobias Young Investigator Award. This award was established to recognize outstanding scientific and/or engineering work in fundamental or applied electrochemistry by a young scientist or engineer, and is the top award the Electrochemical Society awards for early career investigators. Charles Tobias is widely recognized as one of the founding fathers of the field of electrochemical engineering. Charles Tobias spent his entire career at the University of California Berkeley and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), occupying prestigious positions such as Chairman of the Chemical Engineering Department and Acting Dean of the College of Chemistry and was also a past president of The Electrochemical Society.

Adam Weber is a Staff Scientist in the Electrochemical Technologies Group of the Environmental Energy Technologies Division at LBNL. His current research involves understanding and optimizing fuel-cell and related electrochemical device performance and lifetime, including component and ionomer structure/function studies using advanced modeling and diagnostics, understanding flow batteries for grid-scale energy storage, and analysis of solar-fuel generators where he is a Team Leader for Modeling and Simulation at the Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis (JCAP).

While early in his career, Adam has already developed a long list of Industry collaborators and partners with leading U.S. companies (DuPont, General Electric, General Motors, Gore, Ion Power, Proton OnSite, United Technologies, 3M) as well as international firms (Ballard, Robert Bosch, Freudenberg, SGL Carbon, Toyota Motor Company).

To contact or work with Adam: azweber@lbl.gov

DOE Assistant Secretary recognizes Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory researchers for their pioneering work in silicon anode binders for lithium-ion batteries

Dr. Gao Liu and Dr. Vincent Battaglia’s recent achievements were acknowledged by DOE Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy David Danielson during his recent visit to LBNL. Danielson praised the researchers for their pioneering contributions to conducting polymer binders for silicon anodes for high energy density lithium-ion batteries. Lithium ion batteries are used in most of today’s consumer electronics, and hybrid, plug-in hybrid and all-electric vehicles (EVs). The use of silicon anodes shows the promise to boost the energy capacity of lithium-ion batteries by up to 30%. However, classical binders used today cannot absorb the huge swings in material expansion and contraction upon cycling. The new binders developed at LBNL mitigate this crucial problem. They are a based on a new family of conducting polymers that can be tailored for specific silicon anodes. The Berkeley Lab team is working with Envia Inc., 3M, and General Motors to commercialize this technology.

For further information, please contact: Gao Liu or Vince Battaglia

 

Sila Kiliccote (left) receives the Award for Research Leadership at the C3E Symposium

Sila Kiliccote receives a Clean Energy and Empowerment award from DOE-MIT partnership at the C3E Symposium

Sila Kiliccote named as one of eight mid-career women who received a Clean Energy and Empowerment award from DOE-MIT partnership.

As part of the U.S. Clean Energy Education and Empowerment (C3E) program, run by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the MIT Energy Initiative (MITEI), Sila Kiliccote, leader of the Grid Integration Group at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, was recognized for her accomplishments in the area of research leadership at the annual C3E Women in Clean Energy Symposium on Wednesday, September 17th.

"I'm honored to receive the C3E award for research leadership," said Kiliccote."All kinds of clean energy technologies—energy-efficient, renewable, and Smart Grid-related—have a bright future, and women in science, engineering, policy, business, law and other fields have a considerable opportunity to help shape these technologies and increase their adoption. I look forward to participating in Clean Energy Education and Empowerment's global network to strengthen both the reach of clean energy technologies and the role of women professionals in this field."  For the full article go here.

Adam Weber (center) holds Presidential Early Career award, with Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz to his right, and Sunita Satyapal, head of the Fuel Cell Technologies Office.

Adam Weber receives Presidential Early-Career Scientist Award

President Obama named Dr. Adam Weber as one of this year’s recipients of the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers, the highest honor bestowed by the United States Government on science and engineering professionals in the early stages of their career.  He was nominated based on his applied research on fuel cells for the Department of Energy.

Transport phenomena in electrochemical technologies are at the crux of Adam Weber’s research interests.  He has studied water and thermal management, durability, and manufacturing issues in low-temperature fuel cells, through both mathematical modeling and advanced component diagnostics.  This work has interacted with various industrial partners and has led to many fruitful joint-collaborations aimed at optimizing, understanding, and improving the technologies.

His fuel-cell work is now being leveraged into improving redox flow-batteries for grid-scale electrical energy storage.  Working together with Berkeley Lab scientists Venkat Srinivasan, Vincent Battaglia, and research associate Kyu Taek Cho, the team has developed what is believed to be one of the highest power density flow-batteries to date.

Adam Weber’s current research is also focused on transport and properties of ion-conducting polymers, especially their existence as both membranes and thin films in electrode structures for various electrochemical technologies.  Additional interests include understanding and optimizing solar-fuel generators, as done at the Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis, where Dr. Weber is the Modeling and Simulation Team (MaST) lead.

Although still early in his career, Adam has already developed a long list of industry collaborations and partners with several leading U.S. companies (DuPont, General Electric, General Motors, Gore, Ion Power, Proton OnSite, United Technologies, 3M) as well as international firms (Ballard, Bosch, Freudenberg, Johnson Matthey, Nuvera, SGL Carbon, Toyota).

To learn more about this year’s Presidential Early-Career Scientist Award go here.

For further information, please contact Adam Weber

Samveg Saxena receives SAE Award (2014 Forest R. McFarland Award)

Congratulations to ESDR scientist Samveg Saxena, who received the Forest R. McFarland award, which recognizes individuals for outstanding contributions to the SAE Engineering Meetings Board and the development and dissemination of information through technical meetings, conferences, and professional development programs, or for contributions in facilitating or enhancing the interchange of technical information.  For more information go here.

OpenADR Standard published as internationally available specification

In February, Open Automated Demand Response (OpenADR) achieved another milestone toward becoming an international standard when the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC), a renowned standards development organization, released a profile of OpenADR 2.0 as a Publicly Available Specification (PAS). This action recognizes OpenADR as a standard that will enable our electricity systems to be more responsive and smarter about operating under numerous economic, environmental, and security restraints. OpenADR 2.0 is already a national standard in the United States, as the result of Smart Grid standards interoperability activities coordinated by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and Smart Grid Interoperability Panel (SGIP).

Demand Response Research Center (DRRC) researchers at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) originally conceived of and developed the OpenADR specification in 2002, to support automated demand response and dynamic pricing electricity programs. Since then it has been further developed by the Organization of Structured Information Standards (OASIS) and has become a national standard that is widely supported by Smart Grid stakeholders and vendors. It is an integral element of Smart Grid activities worldwide. The OpenADR Alliance, a nonprofit organization with more than 100 members, is now responsible for its adoption and is testing a certification authority for an OpenADR 2.0 standard.  For the full article go here.

Vehicle-to-Grid Simulator Will Help Plug-In Electric Vehicles Become an Electric Grid Resource

Plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) are here, and more are coming. By 2013, 100,000 PEVs were sold in the United States, and the number is growing. One case study forecasts that more than a million plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) will be sold in California, New York, Washington, and Florida alone between 2013 and 2022. Electric vehicles (EVs) are also growing in range and sales. As the cost of battery packs comes down, the number of car shoppers willing to consider buying EVs will go up.

The growth of the PEV fleet means that an unplanned but potentially valuable energy storage resource is also growing—the battery packs of these vehicles. When PEVs are plugged in, they represent an opportunity to better manage the electricity grid. For instance, PEVs can be used to avoid potential shortages of electricity during peak times, provide extra storage capacity when the grid is generating more than it needs to satisfy demand, and encourage the growth of renewable energy by providing a buffer to balance out the intermittency of wind and solar generation.  For the full article go here.

EETD Microgrids Researchers to Collaborate with MIT and IIT-Comillas University

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) announces the signature of a collaboration license with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and IIT-Comillas University (Madrid) for its Utility of the Future Program. DER-CAM, software developed in the Microgrids Group at the Environmental Energy Technologies Division (EETD), will play a key-role in this project, which is part of the MIT Energy Initiative.

Greater utilization of local energy resources, increasing use of natural gas (NG), and integration of renewables (solar photovoltaic and wind) into electricity supply are prominent in contemporary discussions of energy policy both in the European Union and the U.S. The deployment of distributed generation (DG) and renewable energy sources is expected to grow in coming years, and significant impacts on the operation and planning of distribution grids and, more generally, the sustainability of energy systems, are expected.  See the IEEE Smart Grid article, "DER-CAM: An Optimal Tool for Microgrid Design."

DER-CAM, the Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model, has been developed and improved for more than 10 years at Berkeley Lab. The main feature of DER-CAM is its ability to determine the cost-optimal design inside one or more buildings. It chooses which DG technologies a customer should adopt and how these technologies should be operated based on specific site load, technology characteristics and price information. This makes DER-CAM the ideal software for such a project. For the full article on the Environmental Energy Technologies (EETD) website go here.

Gao Liu receives award from FMC

LBNL researchers recognized by FMC Corporation

A joint team of scientists from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) and Argonne National Laboratory was recognized by FMC Corporation for the FMC Scientific Achievement Award. The team has performed fundamental research on the lithium metal technology and helped to identify application methodologies of the lithium metal product into high-energy lithium-ion battery for transportation applications. This work is part of the Integrated Laboratories and Industry Research Program, supported by the Battery for Advanced Transportation Technologies Program of Vehicle Technologies Office of U.S. Department of Energy. FMC Corporation is a global company, and a world leader in the manufacture of lithium products.

This success illustrates Berkeley Lab’s commitment to the growth and development of relationships and collaborations with Industry.

Berkeley Lab awardees are Principal Investigators Gao Liu, Vincent Battaglia and Andrew M. Minor, as well as Postdocs: Zhihui Wang, Bin Xiang, Sang-Jae Park, and Lei Wang.

Gao Liu’s research topics in Lithium-ion rechargeable batteries include advanced electrode design and formulation, silicon based anode materials, electrode binder design and synthesis, electrolyte and additives.

Vince Battaglia works on electrode design and preparation process optimization, cell components integration and battery testing, as well as failure analysis.

Andrew Minor's research group uses advanced electron microscopy-based materials characterization to investigate both organic and inorganic materials on topics such as nanomechanical size effects, lightweight alloy metallurgy, characterization of soft materials, and novel in-situ TEM methods for materials science research.

Venkat Srinivasan, Adam Weber, Vince Battaglia

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Adam Weber receives Presidential Early-Career Scientist Award

President Obama named Dr. Adam Weber as one of this year's recipients of the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers, the highest honor bestowed by the United States Government on science and engineering professionals in the early stages of their career.  He was nominated based on his applied research on fuel cells for the Department of Energy.

Transport phenomena in electrochemical technologies are at the crux of Adam Weber’s research interests.  He has studied water and thermal management, durability, and manufacturing issues in low-temperature fuel cells, through both mathematical modeling and advanced component diagnostics.  This work has interacted with various industrial partners and has led to many fruitful joint-collaborations aimed at optimizing, understanding, and improving the technologies.

His fuel-cell work is now being leveraged into improving redox flow-batteries for grid-scale electrical energy storage.  Working together with Berkeley Lab scientists Venkat Srinivasan, Vincent Battaglia, and research associate Kyu Taek Cho, the team has developed what is believed to be one of the highest power density flow-batteries to date.

Adam Weber’s current research is also focused on transport and properties of ion-conducting polymers, especially their existence as both membranes and thin films in electrode structures for various electrochemical technologies.  Additional interests include understanding and optimizing solar-fuel generators, as done at the Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis, where Dr. Weber is the Modeling and Simulation Team (MaST) lead.

Although still early in his career, Adam has already developed a long list of industry collaborations and partners with several leading U.S. companies (DuPont, General Electric, General Motors, Gore, Ion Power, Proton OnSite, United Technologies, 3M) as well as international firms (Ballard, Bosch, Freudenberg, Johnson Matthey, Nuvera, SGL Carbon, Toyota).

To learn more about this year's Presidential Early-Career Scientist Awards: http://newscenter.lbl.gov/news-releases/2014/01/07/president-obama-honors-outstanding-early-career-scientists/